TED Talks: ideas worth spreading

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Need to learn more about finance, but don’t have the time or patience to read an entire book on the subject? Try checking out TED Talks.

Video below.

TED (Technology, Entertainment and Design) began as a conference in 1984, that today “covers almost all topics—from science to business to global issues—in more than 100 languages.” Current tags include finance, economics, money, and more. Users can also browse or search for topics of interest.

In addition, the speakers featured on TED are carefully selected. Many are experts in their fields, and the site’s guidelines regarding science and health talks, for example, dictate that all information must be supported by peer-reviewed research.

Perhaps best of all, as a nonprofit, all content on TED’s site is free to listen to, watch, or download.

One talk (of thousands) worth listening to is by economist Shlomo Benartzi. According to his biography, “Benartzi studies behavioral finance with a special interest in personal finance. He is co-founder of the Behavioral Finance Forum (www.behavioralfinanceforum.com), a collective of 40 prominent academics and 40 major financial institutions from around the globe. The Forum helps consumers make better financial decisions by fostering collaborative research efforts between academics and industry leaders.

“Benartzi’s most significant research contribution is the development of Save More Tomorrow™ (SMarT), a behavioral prescription designed to help employees increase their savings rates gradually over time.”

The introduction to his “Saving for Tomorrow, Tomorrow” video states, “It’s easy to imagine saving money next week, but how about right now? Generally, we want to spend it. Economist Shlomo Benartzi says this is one of the biggest obstacles to saving enough for retirement, and asks: How do we turn this behavioral challenge into a behavioral solution?” 

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Just another multi-disciplinary writer and bundle of contradictions trying to figure out how to get the most out of life, and make a living while I'm at it.

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