Adult Supervision

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2017 was not a banner year for adulthood. Entitled authority figures got caught behaving like bad-seed children, rational people threw logic and morals to the wind, and an entire room of adults green-lit the Daddy’s Home sequel.

Enter Hal Rubenstein, the best-selling author and founding editor of Instyle who covers fashion, food, and all the good things in life which he unabashedly indulges in. Now he has a new podcast, All Grown Up, in which he makes the case for the virtues and surprises of being an adult.

“The adults I know are smart, talented, funny, engaging, and sexy and I want to share the ways you can improve and revel in where you are right now,” Hal says in a holiday preview for the podcast, which officially debuts next year.

Rubenstein, the New York editor of FourTwoNine, has spent his career investigating the elements of a refined but pragmatic, worth-while life. Formerly the Men’s Style Editor of The New York Times Magazine, he is the author of 100 Unforgettable Dresses and Paisley Goes with Nothing, and was the restaurant critic for New York for seven years. He understands the power in how we dress, entertain, eat, and decorate—and if you can weave all these signposts of adulthood together, “each day can be a hell of challenge and even bigger reward,” he says.

The podcast’s recently released preview, “13 Tips for a Happy Holiday,” serves as an antidote to the distraction of smartphones and the deluge of news during the holiday season. (Just be forewarned, he slips in a Grey’s Anatomy spoiler from season 11).

“Go see something live!” Hal extols listeners for his 6th tip. “Rediscover the true meaning of the word wonder.”

Perhaps his most relevant piece of advice: “No politics” during the holidays. But following tip no. 7 doesn’t mean you have to take a monastic vow of silence until January. Remaining conversational topics include “sports or trashy movies, fashion and sex, philosophy or gossip, climate change or the royal wedding.”

However tempting it may be to glamorize the carelessness of childhood—especially during the holidays—the responsibilities of adulthood give us more opportunities to create our own experiences.

As Hal says, “When the world out there sucks, your world doesn’t have to.”

About The Author

Samuel Braslow is the managing editor at FourTwoNine Magazine, and covers current events and politics for the website.

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